Review: Everdell

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Everdell is a worker-placement, engine and tableau builder designed by James A. Wilson and released by Starling Games. In the game players build their own forrest city in a fable world, that really comes to life through the beautiful artwork by Andrew Bosley. The game has gained some notability through the use of a 3D tree that only serves as a card standard and is of hardly any utility in the game. But is a show stopper at your gaming table. Everdell was the Runner-Up at the 2018 Golden Geek awards in the artwork and presentation category. Is artwork and presentation everything Everdell brings to the table or is there more that meets the eye?

Review: Fertility

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Fertility is a very straightforward and charming game about placing domino style tiles on common board to obtain resources (Alabaster, Bovines, Papyrus flowers and Grapes), that you then spend to develop your own personal board with district tiles. Resources gained don’t carry over to the next round, so you have to have the right empty spots on your district titles to be able to store them.

Review: Wingspan

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Wingspan is the newest game from Stonemaier Games. That is enough for some to be interested in this game. The game was designed by Elizabeth Hargrave and has beautiful watercolor-like illustrations by Ana Maria Martinez Jaramillo, Natalia Rojas and Beth Sobel. A complete women’s team! Wingspan created a lot of interest and hype among board game enthusiasts in the first quarter of 2019. The game, but also the designer got a nice spotlight article in the New York Times.

Top 6 Games of 2018

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2018 was yet another great year for board games. As the industry expands and more and more people get into the hobby so does the selection of great and diverse games. There are fantastic games for every taste now. It is just a matter of finding out what you like and then trying them out. These are my Top 6 Games of 2018.

Review: Star Realms: Frontiers

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Build your fleet and destroy your opponent. As with most good space themed games or movies, Star Realms: Frontiers puts you in the middle of a battle for space. You command a space force consisting of one or multiple different factions to take on the enemy. Will they bring others from similar factions or unite the remaining factions to stake their dominance?

Review: Blue Lagoon

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A mere glance at the box of Blue Lagoon and the soundtrack of Disney’s “Moana” starts playing in the back of my head. Both board game and movie are set in a Polynesian archipelago, against a background of exploration and discovery.

In Blue Lagoon by Blue Orange Games, players are seafarers exploring new-found islands and making them their home. Playing as rivalling tribes, there’s a tough competition for land and resources.

Review: Tallinn

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Tallinn is the largest and capital city of Estonia and also the second game in the Ostia Spiele series of Baltic city games. In the 14th century Tallinn (then called Reval) was an important city within the Hanseatic League, a commercial and defensive confederation of merchant guilds and market towns spanning the modern day countries of Estonia, Germany, Latvia, the Netherlands, Poland, Russia and Sweden. In Tallinn, the game, you are trying to gain influence over the merchants, monasteries and knights that live in and surround the important city.

Review: Subatomic

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H₂O, CO₂, H₂SO₄. Water, carbon dioxide, sulfuric acid; these are molecular formulas most people would recognize. Well, maybe not sulfuric acid, but for some reason that one has always stuck in my mind. Most people could then tell you that H₂O means water and that it is composed of molecules with two atoms of hydrogen and one oxygen. However, if you ask people what makes a hydrogen atom hydrogen they would probably stare at you with a blank face. In Subatomic, by Genius Games, you go even smaller to create the atoms themselves.

Review: Tulip Bubble

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In case you didn’t know, in the Netherlands in 1637 investment in Tulips were a thing. Not just any thing, but apparently a major thing that led to economic turmoil when investors couldn’t even afford the cheapest varieties of Tulips. In Tulip Bubble, you play said investors trying to avoid the crash and stay afloat by buying and selling to make the most profit. Personally I think tulips are beautiful, but I can’t say I have ever thought about investing in tulips for my retirement. But should I?